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Shine Music School’s first ukelélico event!

We invite you to join us, where we enjoy playing the ukulele together, in a small gathering that will be lots of fun, and good music! It’s always a great idea to play the uke! So grab you uke and come and join in on the good times in Shine’s first ukulele event in Barcelona.

 

Saturday, 27 de mayo
The Music Room (c/ Perla, nº 22)
from 19.30h

Download our PDF of 10 songs to practice beforehand, or just as a resource for fun! You can play the ukulele anywhere! It´s easy and portable!

10 song pdf.

download by clicking the following link!
! Y TUKE TOCAS

Si no tienes un uke, puedes alquilar uno desde:

https://instrumentrentalbarcelona.com/product/ukulele/

João Silva, an accomplished musician, shares his notable knowledge and experience with students of The Shine School of Music, where he teaches the violin. On Saturday the 22nd of April he will be presenting his new work on the violin in a small concert held at The Music Room for a limited audience.

We invite all Students and friends of Shine Music School to come and join us for a drink and the concert, but hurry, we only have 30 places! 🙂 You can purchase a ticket at Shine Music School in Gracia or at The Music Room. Contact us to find out more!

We look forward to seeing you there!

  • c/ La Perla 22
  • 16.30h
  • 22 April 2017

 

Born in Ponte de Lima, Portugal (1991), and growing up in an amateur musicians family he started having contact with music when he was very young. At the age of 12 he began studying classical violin at the Professional Music School of Viana do Castelo, Portugal, where he completed his degree in classical violin. At the age of 19 he began studying violin at the Hot Jazz Club of Portugal and two years later studied in ESMUC, Barcelona.
In Barcelona, he now leads and takes part in different bands such as, “João Silva & Mariano Camarasa” (Jazz), Basarab (Balkan) and DuCaña (Traditional Music of Brazil). All of them featured in several festivals and different countries such as Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Ukraine and Switzerland.

 

Music is one of the most complex and engaging human expressions. Ever since the first humans started experimenting with rhythmic patterns, the art of mixing sound and silence has managed to cross cultural and language barriers, and has become an essential part of the human experience.

Although music tends to feel as an emotional and even magical creation, there are very real and measurable scientific reasons behind a lot of its effects on humans.

1. Dopamine release

Those chills you feel when you are listening to a song that just “makes your heart explode”… well, scientists have made studies proving that a dopamine release in the brain is behind this feeling. Incidentally, dopamine is also released during sex and when eating chocolate…so, next time you’re feeling moved by a love song, remember to thank your brain chemicals for the ride.

2. Music can change your heartbeat

No, we are not talking about your heart skipping a beat when the radio plays that song you used to dance with your first love. Studies have shown that the human heart beat tends to accelerate involuntarily when listening to fast paced music (trance/techno) and tends to slow down when listening to minimal house music for example.

3. Music can be addictive (addictive as in drugs)

Can’t wait to charge your phone so you can listen to your new favorite track over and over again, itching to hear your favorite band play live? Well, turns out the dopamine release in the brain related to our musical experiences means that besides the emotional cues we get from the experience, our bodies also become accustomed to the chemical rush elicited by sounds. So, next time your guitarist claims to be addicted to his new riff, you might have to take his word for it. It’s not him, it’s the dopamine in his brain.

As it turns out, science and music are not as unrelated as you might think. In fact, regardless of the genre, music can affect our bodies as much as it affects our minds and soul.

1. Use a metronome.

It´s all about timing.  If music is the art of alternating sound and silence, the precision with which you can understand and subdivide time is crucial to the groove. Practicing with the metronome at slow speeds will improve sense of timing and practicing at higher tempos will help you achieve accuracy and precision. Don´t forget to incorporate metronome exercises in your practicing schedule and you´re guaranteed to hear the results!

2. Play with other people.

Art does not exist in a vacuum. Even if you are a solo singer songwriter that hates sharing the stage with anyone else but his guitar, you can benefit from playing with other people. Music is a interactive skill that requires deep sensibility and quick reflexes, but more importantly, its about learning to listen.  Getting together with other players and learning to communicate with them through music will undoubtedly help you to gain a deeper understaning of yourself as a musician

3- Transcribe songs by ear.

Music is first and foremost, a listening art.  Although there are thousands of resources to help you learn new songs, nothing beats sitting next to the cd player for hours on end, and picking apart your favorites songs note by note. Transcribe a song by ear every week and you will quickly develop an ability to recognize and find notes on your instrument. Your bandmates and ears with thank you.

4- Learn other styles of music.

They say nothing interesting happens inside of our comfort zone. That is definitely true for music.  After a while playing your music style of choice you´ll start to develop a matching vocabulary as you become more comfortable with it. This is all good and well, but sometimes its easy to keep repeating the same ideas over and over again. That´s when a roadtrip across different genres of music can refresh our musical outlook and give you new ideas and concepts to apply in your music. Sometimes, forcing yourself to play things you usually dismiss can open up new avenues and take  your creative spirits to paths you never imagined before.

5- Practice 30 minutes daily (better than cramming 6 hours one day a week)

They say that  practice makes perfect.

5 tips for bassists

So you have seen the light… After many sleepless nights you have finally understood what your soul was aching for: bone shattering lows and thick chunky grooves, earth shaking notes are what make your heart sing. Welcome to the wonderful world of bass playing. You are in good company, from Jaco Pastorius to Paul McCartney,  from Victor Wooten to Pino Paladino, the bass is one of the most powerful and expressive instruments out there. Here we have gathered some tips from experienced bassists that might save you valuable time in your quest to master the instrument.

1. It’s all about the fingers!

Tone. Feeling. Mojo. These are words used to describe that elusive sound that separates the masters from the students. No matter how expensive your instrument is, no matter how many effects are plugged into your loop channel, no matter how much you turn that amp up to 11. It’s all about the tone, and as many masters have taught us, tone is in the fingers.  Exploring the sonic possibilities is a life long journey, and there certainly is a lot of gear out there to keep you busy,  just don’t forget that whatever equipment in your signal path it all starts with your fingers.

2. Use your ears (don’t rely on patterns)

Navigating a fretboard can be intimidating, thats why a lot of guitarists and bassists  lean on scale or chord patterns they can easily move around to transpose. Although useful, you can start to rely too heavily on the “visual” part of the patterns, hampering your ability to develop your ears. Remember that though visual patterns are a great memorization tool, music is about listening, so don’t forget to open your ears.

3. Learn to play in the pocket

Maybe you have heard drummers and bassists talk about the “pocket”. The concept may sound foreign but you have certainly felt its effects. That feeling when the rhythm section is completely looked into groove? thats the pocket. Some people have defined it as a precise timing between kick drum and bass notes, others call it playing with perfect timing, others simple call it “groove”. Whatever you choose to call it, playing in the pocket is one of the elements that separates the casual player from the dedicated professional.

4. Play for the song

We’ve all been there. You’ve been practicing that sick slap riff all month and want to show it off the first chance you get. That slow flute solo in the middle of the song? perfect place to practice your finger acrobatics.  The solo ends and the band looks at you befuddled. Remember that the best musicians never stop listening to each other, and always play for the song, and not for the instrument.

5. KISS (Keep it simple, stupid)

Besides being one of the most famous rock and roll bands of all time, KISS is also an acronym for Keep It Simple, Stupid.  The sure fire way to distinguish between an amateur and a professional is, ironically, the notes that they DON’T play.

If you want to improve your bass guitar skills find more information at Shine Music School.

Or rent a bass guitar at Instrument Rental Barcelona.